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Arte-Factual: Jade Burial Mask (Shadow of the Tomb Raider)

In Shadow of the Tomb Raider, the ever-intrepid Lara Croft finds herself doing a spot of treasure-hunting while in Paititi, a hidden city deep in the Peruvian jungles and home to an isolated society which has its roots in Inca, Maya, and even Aztec cultural traditions and beliefs. A jade burial mask is among the many ancient artefacts she unearths during her quest to save the world from a Maya apocalypse. What isn’t immediately clear from the game is whether this particular burial mask ... [Continue Reading]

November 16, 2018 // 4 Comments

5 Fantastic Free Resources on Aztec Mythology

In the co-op action/adventure game Lara Croft and the Guardian of Light, Lara and the Aztec warrior Totec find themselves in a race against time to stop Xolotl, the Keeper of Darkness, from destroying the world. Players may come across a number of relics throughout the game that are named after Aztec gods and mythological creatures, such as the Mask of Tezcatlipoca and Eye of Cipactli. But if you can’t tell your Cihuacoatls from your Huitzilopochtlis, you may find the following ... [Continue Reading]

March 2, 2014 // 7 Comments

5 Fantastic Free Resources for Learning Maya Glyphs

Do you have a passion for Maya archaeology and fancy learning how to read Maya glyphs? While there are a number of books you can buy, such as Michael D.Coe and Mark Van Stone’s Reading the Maya Glyphs (buy this on Amazon/Amazon UK), you might also want to check out these 5 fantastic and completely free online resources, especially if you’re on a tight budget. 1) Writing in Maya Glyphs: A Non-Technical Introduction to Maya Glyphs – This two-part booklet by Mark Pitts is ... [Continue Reading]

October 13, 2013 // 11 Comments

Arte-Factual: Toltec Warriors (Tomb Raider 1)

Sharp-eyed gamers may have noticed that the same colossal sculptures appear repeatedly throughout the Peruvian levels of the original Tomb Raider (1996), most notably in the Tomb of Qualopec. These sculptures are, in fact, based on the real-life Atlantes, or Atlantean pillars, found at Tula, a Postclassic archaeological site in the Mexican state of Hidalgo.** The four Atlantes of Tula are basalt pillars carved in the form of Toltec warriors and are thought to have once supported the roof of ... [Continue Reading]

April 3, 2013 // 10 Comments